Louisiana Crawfish Co. brings mudbug season to faraway Southerners

Louisiana Crawfish Co. brings mudbug season to faraway Southerners | StayingSouthern.net

(Image source: lacrawfish.com)

It’s a tough time of year to live outside the South – crawfish season.

If you’re a Southerner far from home, chances are you’ve spent the last few months drooling over your friends’ Facebook photos of more than a few crawfish boils.

Louisiana Crawfish Co. is a farm after my own heart: They strive to bring the South to those of us who loved it and left it. Founded in 1985, Louisiana Crawfish Co. specializes in shipping Louisiana products – especially live crawfish – just about anywhere. 

Louisiana Crawfish Co. brings mudbug season to faraway Southerners | StayingSouthern.net

(Image source: lacrawfish.com)

Retail and wholesale customers can enjoy live crawfish delivered right to their doorstep.

In addition to crawfish-only orders, Louisiana Crawfish Co. also offers party packs that include live crawfish, seafood boil, their own special Creole seasoning, crawfish bibs, a t-shirt, a koozie and even Mardi Gras beads. With prices starting at about $75, you and 3-6 of your pals will have almost everything you need to have a traditional crawfish boil in your own backyard, wherever that may be. Louisiana Crawfish Co. also accommodates larger shipments, in case you want to invite the whole neighborhood.

Louisiana Crawfish Co. brings mudbug season to faraway Southerners | StayingSouthern.net

(Image source: lacrawfish.com)

This family-owned and operated business leads the industry with tried and true shipping methods and competitive pricing. They stand behind all of their products, offering a money-back guarantee and they will price match if you are able to find a lower delivered cost. With a “why pay more” attitude, the Louisiana Crawfish Co. website offers price comparisons with other retailers.

A standard of stellar quality and service is evident in an abundance of happy customer testimonials.

Louisiana Crawfish Co. doesn’t stop at distributing only mudbugs. Alligator, turtle, various seafood, King Cakes, spices, Lasyone’s meat pies, turduckens,  a wealth of other party supplies and Southern goods are available on LaCrawfish.com.

More than 25 years in the business and over one million pounds of shipped lived crawfish proves this trusted company is here to stay and ready to help you with your next crawfish boil.

Louisiana Crawfish Co. brings mudbug season to faraway Southerners | StayingSouthern.net

(Image source: lacrawfish.com)


Lousiana Crawfish Co.
1-888-522-7292
1-866-593-5320
lacrawfish.com
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Movoto Article: 27 Things You Need To Know About Louisiana Before Moving There

Movoto Article: 27 Things You Need To Know About Louisiana Before Moving There | StayingSouthern.net

Movoto: #1. Louisiana’s National Monuments Are Hard To Pin Down (Image source: Flickr user The Sean and Lauren Spectacular)

Whether you’ve lived in Louisiana or you’ve always wondered what it would be like, there’s no doubt that the Sportsman’s Paradise is a place unlike any other.

A recent Movoto article details “27 Things You Need To Know About Louisiana Before You Move There” and it’s not all alligator hunting and Bourbon Street clichés either.

The article features a few lesser-known fun facts about state including #22, Louisiana’s current “beer-aissance” accelerated by seven craft breweries and it even mentions Louisiana’s growing affinity for the film industry.

Transplant Profile: Anthony Williams in Los Angeles

Transplant Profile: Anthony Williams in L.A. | StayingSouthern.netName: Anthony Williams

Born in: Tyler, Texas

Occupation: Writer, assistant, cashier, background extra, etc.

I currently live in: Los Angeles, California, in the Pico-Union neighborhood.

When I go back to the South, I always: Fail to do everything I want to do. But Taco Cabana is usually my first fast-food stop, whether I’ve driven back and see the first one in El Paso, or fly in and dive into some nachos right after leaving the airport.

Something I miss: I’ve been car-free for a year now, but more than sometimes missing having that kind of transportation, I just miss driving 100 miles or more randomly just to see family or friends. I miss high school football games with huge crowds and intense atmospheres. I miss taking my little cousins off to the city to visit a new mall or new burger joint.  I’ve got people spread all over Texas, and even dotted across the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, and those little road trips were often a good little escape that I appreciate so much more now.

Similarities I find between the South and Los Angeles: The Los Angeles Lakers are almost as revered, worshiped and talked about as the Dallas Cowboys. Almost.

Something I do to keep my Southern identity: I still say, “y’all,” and started saying, “Bless your heart,” here while (working) in retail – to keep my sanity. And, there’s numerous little things I only catch here and there that I do because I’m Southern or just because I grew up used to it – saving and reusing bacon grease, and cooking huge pots of food even if it’ll only be for myself. Weirdly enough, I say “ma’am” and “sir” more here than I did growing up.

Being Southern has helped me: Stand out. Even though I lean more towards being an introvert, I can be a little extra when meeting and hosting people. I help lead a Bible study group with another Southern guy from Georgia. When it’s at my house, I always end up cooking or offering something, despite protests that it’s unnecessary.

Morsel of wisdom to other transplant Southerners: I’m starting to write creatively, and something that hit me while learning the formulas for scripts (yep, there are formulas) was the quote, “It’s the same, but different.” That’s true in writing and in life, and whenever I’ve traveled to or lived somewhere new.

There are basic structure to cities, communities and routines everywhere. While it may be fun and easier to sit and figure out what’s your “new this” or “new that” (“Pasadena’s my new Fort Worth,” “Ralphs is just Kroger,” “the 405 is my new I-635”), it’s better to accept things for what they are so you can sincerely savor it all.

Oh, and whenever you go back home, relax. Thankfully, I have family that can remind me of that when I’m trying to run around to see everyone and do everything. But you should be able to just chill all day at an aunt’s house as if you’re eight years old again.

Would you or someone you know like to contribute a Transplant Profile? See the contact page!

Read more Transplant Profiles here

Transplant Profile: Stinson Carter in Los Angeles, California

Transplant Profile: Stinson Carter

Stinson’s novel, False River, is available on Amazon.


Name:
Stinson Carter

Born in: Shreveport, Louisiana

Occupation: Screenwriter, Journalist, and Novelist

I currently live in: Los Angeles, CA

When I go back, I always: Eat Southern Maid Donuts and a Herby-K shrimp buster. And I appreciate the time I get to spend with elderly family members. I listen to their stories like it’s the last time they’ll ever be told.

I miss: Family. And being in a place where I have a past. In Los Angeles I feel anonymous most of the time, but in Shreveport I feel like I’m part of a lineage, and there’s a deep comfort wrapped up in that.

Similarities I find between the South and where I live now: There is a kinship between ex-pat Southerners that I enjoy whenever I meet them in California. I’m working on a script with the producer of The Help right now, who is from Jackson, Mississippi. I think the fact that our hometowns are only a couple hundred miles apart definitely helped me get the job.

A Southern value I keep: I value knowing how to cook, and how to be a good host. A modest spread by Southern standards goes a long way in Southern California. Also, being accountable for what you say you’re going to do. In Hollywood you don’t make real plans. For example, you might say to a friend, “Let’s get lunch this week,” and they’ll say, “Yeah, that’d be great!” (Everything is great in Los Angeles.) But of course you don’t actually get lunch. What you’re really doing is just both agreeing that the idea of lunch sounds nice at that moment. There’s an old joke in Hollywood that goes like this:

“Did you hear that so-and-so died?”
“No!”
“Yep”
“That’s a shame. We’ve been meaning to get lunch.”

Being Southern has helped me: Keep a fundamental baseline for my values, and preserve my integrity in a city and within an industry that doesn’t exactly reward it.

Morsel of wisdom to other transplant Southerners: Don’t forget who you are. If you have a strong work ethic and treat people well, then you will make the kind of friends who will root for your success.

Transplant Profile: Stinson Carter in Los Angeles, CaliforniaRead Stinson Carter’s novel, False River, available for download on Amazon now.

Would you or someone you know like to contribute a Transplant Profile? Contact us!

Read more Transplant Profiles here

Recipe: Easy Gumbouffee

Recipe: Easy Gumbouffee | StayingSouthern.net

From the mad-scientist test kitchen: Gumbouffee

What’s that smell? Is that success or the huge pot of Gumbouffee?

My friends, it is both. Although it felt a little like mad science, the recipe for this semi-homemade dish turned out to be oh-so-delicious.

Like we talked about in Friday’s post, store-bought spice mixes are convenient, but they don’t deliver when it comes to authentic flavor and texture. Mainstream products are “good enough” to get by when you’re craving Southern food, but what if you want great?

We combined widely-distributed Louisiana-made products, additional seasonings and a few vegetables. The result was a savory etouffee-meets-gumbo.

The best part about this recipe is how easy it is. Even those who don’t feel comfortable in the kitchen can create an authentic Southern dish. No roux-related stress, no major time commitment. Just a fun, tasty meal with real Creole texture and flavor.

Total time spent in the kitchen was less than an hour, but the Gumbouffee tasted like it had been on the stove all day.

We used catfish in our recipe, but chicken, Andouille sausage, shrimp, crawfish or all of the above would be just as tasty. You could even add okra or diced tomatoes to make it your own. Follow these easy steps and you, too will be saying this sauce is c’est si bon.

Gumbouffee

–       1 box Tony Chachere’s Creole etouffee mixRecipe: Easy Gumbouffee | StayingSouthern.net
–       1 box Zatarain’s gumbo base
–       1 pound catfish, cut into large bite-size chunks
–       3 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
–       1 large yellow onion, chopped
–       2 cups celery, choppedRecipe: Easy Gumbouffee | StayingSouthern.net
–       2 cups green bell pepper, chopped
–       ½ cup green onion, chopped
–       8 cups water
–       1 Tbsp Emeril’s Essence seasoning
–       1/4 cup blackened seasoningRecipe: Easy Gumbouffee | StayingSouthern.net
–       6-8 cups cooked white rice

Directions
–       Mix catfish pieces with blackened seasoningRecipe: Easy Gumbouffee | StayingSouthern.net
–       In a large pot on the stove, heat 2 Tbsp olive oil over medium setting
–       In small batches, cook seasoned catfish until almost done, remove from pot and set aside
–       In the same pot, add 1 Tbsp of olive oil and sauté yellow onion, celery and bell pepper until onion becomes slightly translucent
–       Add Zatarain’s and Tony’s spice mixes, stirring to coat vegetables
–       Gradually add 8 cups of water while stirring frequently
–       Add Emeril’s Essence seasoning and catfishRecipe: Easy Gumbouffee | StayingSouthern.net
–       Bring to a boil, reduce heat and let simmer for about 20-30 minutes until catfish is cooked through, liquid should coat the back of a spoon
–       Serve over cooked rice, garnish with green onion. Feeds 8-10 people

Recipe: “Better For You” Chicken Pot Pie

Recipe: This ain't your mama's chicken pot pie | StayingSouthern.net

This ain’t your mama’s chicken pot pie

I miss Southern food more than anything else about the South – besides my family, of course.

It’s probably a blessing that I don’t live in the South because if I did, I would chronically overeat the delicious but not-so-nutritious regional favorites. (Did someone say boudin?)

In my kitchen, I try to balance recipes that meet the “good and good for you” standard.

Chicken pot pie is one of those dishes that I compare to getting a hug. No doubt, it’s the buttery, creamy sauce and pie crust that makes it taste so good. It’s the epitome of comfort food. But, as comforting as it is, I’m not very comfortable when I can’t button my pants. So, I made some adjustments.

PotPie2This pot pie recipe might not be diet food, but it won’t leave me feeling like I just sold the farm either. By ditching the bottom pie crust, substituting half-and-half with low fat Greek yogurt and replacing traditional potatoes with cauliflower, this fiber-packed dish of bubbly goodness leaves me smiling without all the guilt.

Give it a try! I promise, you won’t even know what you’re missing.

Chicken Pot Pie

1 medium onion, diced

1 Tbsp minced garlic

1 cup cauliflower, diced

1 cup celery, diced

1 cup carrot, diced

1 cup canned sweet peas, drained

3 Tbsp all-purpose flour

3 Tbsp melted margarine

3 Tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1 ½ cups low sodium chicken broth

1 cup low fat Green yogurtPotpie3

1 teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon pepper

1 ½ teaspoon sage

1 teaspoon rosemary

1 teaspoon thyme

4 cups chicken breast, seasoned with poultry seasoning (sage, rosemary and thyme), cooked and diced

1 pie crust (store bought, or your own recipe)

Directions

–       Preheat oven to 400 degrees

–       In a large sauce pan, heat 1 Tbsp of olive oil and sauté onion and garlic over medium heat until onion becomes slightly translucent

–       Add celery, carrots and cauliflower, stirring frequently, until vegetables become tender

–       Combine chicken broth and yogurt in separate bowl

–       Thoroughly mix in melted margarine and remaining olive oil

–       Add flour gradually while stirring constantly for one minute

–       Add chicken broth and yogurt mixture gradually while stirring well until it becomes thick and bubbly

–       Stir in peas, salt, pepper, sage, rosemary, thyme and chicken

–       Pour into a 2 quart casserole dish and cover with 1 pie crust

–       Cut slits to allow steam to escape

–       Bake 20-25 minutes or until crust is golden brown and filling is bubbly

Spanish moss attracts more than just Southerners

There I was, standing in the checkout line at WalMart in Bend, OR.

I looked like a Creole doomsday prepper with a grocery cart full of canned goods; mostly black-eyed peas and French cut green beans. I live in the sticks. When you live way out of town, you have to stock up on certain necessities – my household is never without black-eyed peas.

We do silly things sometimes when we miss home. | StayingSouthern.net

Spanish moss is a perennial epiphytic herb. It is not Spanish, nor a moss, but a flowering plant.

Two checkout lanes over to my left, I saw a woman about my age. In her cart, I spotted a MiracleGro package that said, clear as day, “SPANISH MOSS.”

My heart stopped.

My thoughts began to swirl:

She must be from the South.

Only someone who is desperately homesick for the South would try to grow Spanish moss in this high desert climate. Maybe I should try it in my garden this year.

She looks really happy and smiley. And she’s curled her hair and wearing a lot of eyeliner. Yep. Definitely a Southerner.

She probably just moved here from South Carolina and misses home.

We do silly things sometimes when we miss home. | StayingSouthern.net

(janeluriephotography.wordpress.com)

Hmmm. She might not be very bright if she plans on hanging Spanish moss from Ponderosa pines. I won’t hold that against her. We do silly things sometimes when we miss home.

And boy, do we.

I heaved my cart full of canned goods out of line and pushed it over to the woman.

“Excuse me, miss?” I said.

She interpreted my salutation as a request to get out of my way. “Oh, I’m sorry,” she said as she began to wheel her cart backwards.

“I am just wondering… Are you trying to grow Spanish moss here?” I asked.

She worked for a daycare and this week’s craft project was constructing fairy houses. Apparently, fairies have roofs made of Spanish moss. They must be Southern, too.

“Oh,” I said.

I retreated back to my checkout lane.

It’s true – we do silly things sometimes when we miss home, like approach strangers in WalMart. But in my defense, in the South, asking a complete stranger about their gardening plans is perfectly acceptable. Southerners go on living like they are in the South, even if they’re not.

We do silly things sometimes when we miss home. | StayingSouthern.netMy attempt to find a kindred Southerner may have been thwarted, but it won’t stop me from being just as friendly in the future. It also won’t deter me from possibly building some small, Spanish moss-covered houses to attract Southern fairies.

L’Angelus On Tour

It was a complete accident that I saw this band at the Oyster Ridge Music Festival in Kemmerer, WY a few years ago. Watch the embedded video below and you’ll understand how happy I was to stumble upon L’Angelus (pronounced LAWN JAY LOOSE). Their music brings swampy Cajun flavor to even the most arid parts of the world.

They’ve even opened for the Pope. Yes, they are THAT cool.

This band of brothers and sisters hail from Lafayette, Louisiana, which explains the number of tour dates at Catholic venues. Even if you’re not religious, seeing this band live will be a religious experience – it’s that fun and they’re that good.

Here are some upcoming tour dates that “out of pocket” Southerners can enjoy. Don’t fret if you don’t see your city – they tour far and wide and often. Check out their Facebook page for the latest news.

April 25 – David Foster Foundation Theater – Victoria, Canada 
April 26 – David Foster Foundation Theater – Victoria, Canada
May 3 – St. John’s Festival – Indianapolis, IN
July 12 – Byzantine Catholic Youth Conference – Emmitsburg, MD
August 1- Midwest Catholic Family Conference – Wichita, KS

How to Write a Thank You Note (and why you should)

In this era, steeped in technology, it’s hard to sit down and hand-write a thank-you note when sending a text, tweet or email is so much easier.

Those forms of thank-yous might be immediate, but they’re hardly as personal as a penned note in the mail.

My mother and her sister exchange thank-you notes practically every day, even though they live less than a mile away from each other. They write cards to one another for things as simple as a good chat during a power-walk around the neighborhood or bringing a quiche to Sunday brunch.

It’s easy to feel like thank you notes are wasted on those who don’t write them at all. But, it’s been my experience that showing appreciation is never lost on anyone.

A thank-you note is a tangible experience. Think about it: what do you do when you see an envelope that isn’t a bill or a pre-approved credit card? You smile. You enjoy the feel of the unincorporated envelope and the hand-written address. Then, you open it… and smile again.

A quality thank-you note should read like this:

Dear _________ ,

1. An expression of gratitude for the kindness/gift/presence.
2. How thoughtful it was/how much it was appreciated.
3.  A mention of the future: When you will be seeing each other again and how lovely it will be.
4. Another brief expression of appreciation, closing salutations and the author’s signed name.

Send one of these and people will remember you for the lengths you go to express your gratefulness. The thank you note is possibly the easiest way to create a positive, lasting impression on anyone.

Good manners and gratitude know no zip codes. So keep on writing, because nothing makes a person feel appreciated like receiving a hand-written piece of mail, sent just to say “thank you.”