Louisiana Crawfish Co. brings mudbug season to faraway Southerners

Louisiana Crawfish Co. brings mudbug season to faraway Southerners | StayingSouthern.net

(Image source: lacrawfish.com)

It’s a tough time of year to live outside the South – crawfish season.

If you’re a Southerner far from home, chances are you’ve spent the last few months drooling over your friends’ Facebook photos of more than a few crawfish boils.

Louisiana Crawfish Co. is a farm after my own heart: They strive to bring the South to those of us who loved it and left it. Founded in 1985, Louisiana Crawfish Co. specializes in shipping Louisiana products – especially live crawfish – just about anywhere. 

Louisiana Crawfish Co. brings mudbug season to faraway Southerners | StayingSouthern.net

(Image source: lacrawfish.com)

Retail and wholesale customers can enjoy live crawfish delivered right to their doorstep.

In addition to crawfish-only orders, Louisiana Crawfish Co. also offers party packs that include live crawfish, seafood boil, their own special Creole seasoning, crawfish bibs, a t-shirt, a koozie and even Mardi Gras beads. With prices starting at about $75, you and 3-6 of your pals will have almost everything you need to have a traditional crawfish boil in your own backyard, wherever that may be. Louisiana Crawfish Co. also accommodates larger shipments, in case you want to invite the whole neighborhood.

Louisiana Crawfish Co. brings mudbug season to faraway Southerners | StayingSouthern.net

(Image source: lacrawfish.com)

This family-owned and operated business leads the industry with tried and true shipping methods and competitive pricing. They stand behind all of their products, offering a money-back guarantee and they will price match if you are able to find a lower delivered cost. With a “why pay more” attitude, the Louisiana Crawfish Co. website offers price comparisons with other retailers.

A standard of stellar quality and service is evident in an abundance of happy customer testimonials.

Louisiana Crawfish Co. doesn’t stop at distributing only mudbugs. Alligator, turtle, various seafood, King Cakes, spices, Lasyone’s meat pies, turduckens,  a wealth of other party supplies and Southern goods are available on LaCrawfish.com.

More than 25 years in the business and over one million pounds of shipped lived crawfish proves this trusted company is here to stay and ready to help you with your next crawfish boil.

Louisiana Crawfish Co. brings mudbug season to faraway Southerners | StayingSouthern.net

(Image source: lacrawfish.com)


Lousiana Crawfish Co.
1-888-522-7292
1-866-593-5320
lacrawfish.com
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5 Easy Ways To Celebrate Easter

In my Southern family, Easter always comes with a big celebration. Relatives come to town, huge spreads of food are prepared and the Easter baskets are packed full of treats.

Now, living far away and having only a husband and a dog to celebrate with, the epic festivities seem like a lot of work for just a couple people to enjoy. It’s easy to get complacent about carrying on customs, but each year when I make the effort, I’m never disappointed. Although I may be a far-flung Southerner, I can always take traditions with me wherever I live to make it feel like home.

Here’s five easy ways to celebrate Easter that will have you feeling like you’re back home without a lot of fuss.

1. Dye Easter eggs. This easy activity will have you feeling like a kid again as soon as you try the old half-pink, half-blue dunking method. The eggs in this ancient activity are meant to symbolize new life, reminding Christians of Christ’s resurrection. Ukrainian customs hold great significance in each color of Easter eggs:Here’s five easy ways to celebrate Easter that will have you feeling like you’re back home without a lot of fuss.

White: purity and innocence
Yellow: wisdom, recognition, harvest and reward
Orange: strength, endurance and ambition
Red: happiness, hope or passion
Green: sign of spring, hope and innocence
Blue: good health
Purple: royal color, faith and trust
(Ukrainian Easter by Mary Ann Woloch Vaughn)

5 Easy Ways To Celebrate Easter

2. Eat. In my family, Easter Sunday Mass is always followed by a delectable lunch. Ham was on the menu when we were young, but as everyone got older and the family grew in members, fried chicken from the grocery deli took its place. Either entrée is enjoyable with sides of potato salad and ambrosia salad.

3. Stage an Easter egg hunt. Whether you have kids or you’re a kid at heart, hunting Easter eggs is a surefire way to add a little excitement to your Sunday. Fill plastic eggs with traditional candy, love notes, jokes, money or other fun trinkets to suit the hunters’ taste and bring smiles all around.

5 Easy Ways To Celebrate Easter

Photo: Maida Owens louisianafolklife.org

4. Knock Eggs. Whether you call it egg tapping, tucking, pocking or pâquing, this tradition is a competitive sport in Louisiana. My mother taught my brothers and me when we were young and the tournament-style competition has been an Easter ritual ever since. The rules vary by region, but my family’s are simple: knock the pointy ends of two hardboiled Easter eggs until one of them cracks. The unbroken egg goes on until the last intact egg is standing. Don’t be shy about getting into it. Since 1956, people in Marksville, La. gather in the courthouse square after Easter Sunday church services to compete. Some families even make brackets and keep score.

5 Easy Ways To Celebrate Easter5. Go to church. I’ve lived a lot of places, most of them hundreds or thousands of miles away from my tight-knit family. Going to church has always made me feel close to them no matter how far away I may be geographically. Raised Catholic, there is a comfort in knowing my family members are hearing the same scriptures and saying the same prayers as I am at Mass 2,100 miles away.

Tutorial: Blending tastes in the living room

(seriouslyflowers.com)

(seriouslyflowers.com)

This time of year, it’s hard to relate to my friends and family back home in Louisiana who are enjoying the first blooms of spring and 75-degree weather.

I’m on the tail-end of a five-month winter, give or take a few days of teasing warm temperatures. And today, it’s snowing again. Despite the wintery weather, spring fever has got a hold on me.

Since the weather (and the frozen, volcanic soil) isn’t inviting me to work on the outside of my house, I’m working on the inside.

I've heard Monticello has European mounts.

I’ve heard Monticello has European mounts.

Decorating a home shared with my Michigander-outdoorsman husband is a balancing act.

He likes raw earth-given materials and he is naturally attracted to more masculine décor (i.e. the bull elk European mount hanging in our living room).

I like French Country.

This entertainment center, handcrafted for us by our friend, was a special addition to our living room. When people make you furniture by hand, it’s a big deal. I’m fond of it and its meaning goes beyond words, but aesthetically, it favors my husband’s taste.

This cabinet/shelf combo was made out of various conifer lumber.

(Click for full size image) This cabinet/shelf combo was made out of various conifer lumber.

Although it’s become a centerpiece, its main purpose is function. That big TV has a huge amount of unsightly accouterment.

The task at hand is to hide the ugly technical mess and infuse my personal taste.

First, the speakers need to go. If I use the word “camouflage” when explaining this arrangement to my husband, he will be totally on board.

TIP: Wrangle all visible cords. You’ll be amazed at how tidy anything looks after taming haywire power cords. I recommend using twist ties and masking tape (no duct tape – it will ruin your furniture).

I’m “camouflaging” the right speaker with this pewter, vintage-style frame with a watercolor painted by my dear Aunt Mary Ceil. The shed antler brings interest and dimension.

The art was actually a birthday card my aunt painted for my mom.

The picture was actually a birthday card my aunt painted for my mom.

The left speaker is hidden with a short cube-shaped vase holding silk hydrangeas ($3.99 on the floral aisle at WalMart).

Yes, the speaker is really behind there.

Yes, the speaker is really behind there.

I have seen ideas on Pinterest about gutting books and placing the empty hard covers around wifi routers and modems. I can’t bring myself to deface any of my own books, so I’m hiding the Internet gear behind them.

I take every opportunity to infuse equestrian décor into my living space.

I take every opportunity to infuse equestrian décor into my living space.

Lastly, I’m adding a fleur de lis candle crib to balance out the empty bottom left shelf.

Candle crib

Candle crib

I don’t know if “candle crib” is a real term, but I think it describes the object more eloquently than “holder.” So, I’m going with it. Get on board at the ground level and start using the phrase with me.

A little character goes a long way.

(Click for full size image) A little character goes a long way.

And that my friends, is how you blend the style of a manly Northern hunter-fisher-gatherer and a Southern girl.

Do you have an idea you want to share with StayingSouthern.net? Tell us!

Tutorial: Gaudy Mardi Gras Wreath

I miss the South quite a bit during Mardi Gras season. Thanks to Facebook and Twitter, I get inundated with photos of my friends and family celebrating at crawfish boils, parades and Mardi Gras balls on a daily basis.

I love where I live and my lifestyle, but it’s times like this that I’m not too proud to say, I’m envious.

Living a few thousand miles away just means I must be the master of my own celebration. This usually involves some sort of crafting frenzy. And, nothing tells your new neighborhood who you are and where you’re from like the world’s biggest, gaudiest Mardi Gras wreath adorning your front porch.

"Hi, I'm your new neighbor, and in case you didn't know, it's Mardi Gras season."

“Hi, I’m your new neighbor, and in case you didn’t know, it’s Mardi Gras season.”

As you can imagine, Mardi Gras supplies are limited around the rural parts of Central Oregon. I was grateful I kept a few pounds of beads from a parade in my beloved Natchitoches, LA a few years ago. If you’re not a hoarder (like I am), you can find beads and other Mardi Gras supplies at a Party City or other craft stores. This wreath took less than an hour to complete.

Here’s how I did it:

Step 1: I like to reuse craft supplies. I took this large, artificial garland wreath and wrapped it in burlap (found on the floral aisle of WalMart). Make sure no garland is peeking out.

Step 1: Wrap garland wreath with burlap

Step 1: Wrap garland wreath with burlap

Step 2: I like to use wire to fasten things on my wreaths.

I like to use wire to fasten things on my wreaths.

I like to use floral/craft wire to fasten things to my wreaths because it cuts down on waste. That’s just me. When dismantling a wreath that’s covered in hot glue, I usually end up throwing away a lot. But if you’re into hot glue, more power to you.

I know what you’re thinking – “that will never hold.” But it will. This wreath sustained two snowstorms and 50 mph winds in January and February.

Step 2: Add ribbon in the same fashion as the burlap. I tied some of it on, other parts I used wire. Get creative.

Step 3: Add ribbon

Step 2: Add ribbon

Step 3: Add beads. I gathered five strands and connected them in a U-shape piece of craft wire. Then, I twisted the U together so my strands were secure and I had a long wire “stick” I poked into the garland through the burlap. It took a little adjusting, but if your wire is long enough, it will poke through the back of the wreath and you can bend it into a secure position.

Step 4: Add beads

Step 4: Add beads

Poke wire into wreath

Poke wire into wreath

Step 4: Add bows, a masque and other trinkets you have on hand. I actually received all of these bows on presents at one time or another. I used the same U-shape wire technique to attach the bow to wire and then poke the wire through the burlap and garland.

Step 5: Add bows, a masque, etc. using same U-shape wire technique.

Step 4: Add bows, a masque, etc. using same U-shape wire technique.

I like to make my wreaths "imperfect" to give it that touch of Mardi Gras fun.

I like to make my wreaths “imperfect” to give it that touch of Mardi Gras fun.

Ha cha cha!

Ha cha cha!

Have fun with it! It’s all about making the wreath your own. I always find that it helps to put on a little Mardi Gras Mambo while I’m working on projects like this. And remember, it’s the small everyday things you do that can make you feel at home no matter where you are. Happy Mardi Gras, ya’ll!

A Wyoming take on “Virginia’s Holiday Finest”

I am crazy about seasonal wreaths. My taste swings back and fourth between simplistic and “more is better” depending on the season and my resources at the time.

Resources? Yes, resources. See, I’m a stern penny pincher. Most of what I use to make my front door décor is stuff I have hoarded away in my “craft closet” for the last couple of years I have actually had an extra closet in my house.

If I need something that’s not in the ribbon-and-glitter-packed closet, I scour the clearance aisles at places like WalMart and Tuesday Morning.

I picked up this sweet little autumn-themed gem at WalMart for $1.99 with the intention of using it for parts during my next crafting frenzy.

Look for "red-tagged" items on the clearance aisle.

Look for “red-tagged” items on the clearance aisle.

Then, I fell in love with this wreath in Southern Living:

Southern Living magazine is where I turn to for a great deal of my Southern inspiration.

Southern Living magazine is where I turn to for a great deal of my Southern inspiration.

I love when my go-to sources for Southern style blend masculine aspects of the outdoors with charming regional classics. It’s a balance I’m always trying to strike since my husband would put antlers on everything if I agreed to it.

To achieve my rendition of “Virginia’s Holiday Finest,” I had to improvise. Living in Wyoming at the time, I had no access to on-the-stem cotton. I did, however, have pheasant feathers from a friend’s recent hunt, conifer boughs and whitetail deer antlers.

I dismantled the bargain wreath. I added spruce boughs from our Christmas tree, artificial berries (and a faux bird) my office was discarding from past holiday decorations, spruce cones from my yard and a pair of shed antlers I found ages ago hanging in a sage brush.

This was the final product:

Wyoming offers similar, if not the same, materials necessary to make up this cheery holiday porch decor.

Wyoming offers similar, if not the same, materials necessary to make up this cheery holiday porch decor.

The wreath brought a big smile to my face every time I walked up to my front door. It reminded me that even though I may be far from my Southern home, a few touches and a little effort here and there will make it seem a little closer.